the photoshooter's journey from taking to making

I SEE YOUR FACE BEFORE ME

Edward Steichen's amazing 1923 portrait of dance icon Isadora Duncan beneath a massive arch of the Parthenon in Greece.

Edward Steichen’s amazing 1921 portrait of dance icon Isadora Duncan beneath a massive arch of the Parthenon in Greece, an image which recently surged to the top of my mind. See a link to a larger view of this shot, below.  

By MICHAEL PERKINS

THE IMAGES SIT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BRAIN, LIKE STONE PILLARS IN THE FOUNDATION OF AN IMMENSE TOWER.The structures erected on top of them, those images we ourselves have fashioned in memory of these foundations, dictate the height and breadth of our own creative edifices. Between these elemental pictures and what we build on top of them, we derive a visual style of our own.

In my own case,many of the pillars that hold up my own house of photography come from a single man.

Edward Steichen is arguably the greatest photographer in history. If that seems like hyperbole, I would humbly suggest that you take a reasonable period of time, say, oh, twenty years or so, just to lightly skim the breadth of his amazing career….from revealing portraits to iconic product shots to nature photography to street journalism and half a dozen other key areas that comprise our collective craft of light writing. His work spans the distance from wet glass plates to color film, from the Edwardian era to the 1960’s, from photography as an insecure imitation of painting to its arrival as a distinct and unique art form in its own right.

At the start of the 20th century, Steichen co-sponsored many of the world’s first formal photographic galleries, and was a major contributor to Camera Work, the first serious magazine dedicated wholly to photography. He ended his career as the creator of the legendary Family Of Man, created in the early 1950’s and still the most celebrated collection of global images ever mounted anywhere on earth. He is, simply, the Moses of photography, towering above many lesser giants whose best work amounts to only a fraction of his own prodigious output.

Which is why I sometimes see fragments of what he saw when I view a subject. I can’t see with his clarity, but through the milky lens of my own vision I sometime detect a flashing speck of what he knew on a much larger scale, decades before. The image at left recently rocketed to my mind’s eye several weeks ago, as I was framing shots inside a large government building in Ohio.In 1921, Steichen journeyed to Greece to use the world’s oldest civilization basically as a prop for portraits of Isadora Duncan, then in the forefront of American avant-garde dance. Framing her at the bottom of an immense arch in the ruins of the Parthenon, he made her appear majestic and minute at the same time, both minimized and deified by the huge proportions in the frame. It is one of the most beautiful compositions I have ever seen, and I urge you to click the Flickr link at the end of this post for a slightly larger view of it. (Also note the link to a great overview of Steichen’s life on Wikipedia.)

Uplighting creates a strange frame-within-frame feel at the Ohio Statehouse building, inspired by Edward Steichen's shots of massive arches.

Uplighting creates a moody frame-within-frame feel at the Ohio Statehouse building, in a shot inspired by Edward Steichen’s images of massive arches. 1/30 sec., f/8, ISO 800, 18mm.

In framing a similarly tall arch leading into the rotunda of the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, I didn’t have a human figure to work with, but I wanted to show the building as a series of major and  minor access cavities, in, around, under and through one of its arched entrance to the central lobby. I kept having to back up and step down to get at least a partial view of the rotunda and the arch at the opposite end of the open space included in the frame, which created a kind of left and right bracket for the shot, now flanked by a pair of staircases. Given the overcast sky meekly leaking grey light into the rotunda’s glass cupola, most of the building was shrouded in shadow, so a handheld shot with sufficient depth of field was going to call for jacked-up ISO, and the attendant grungy texture that remains in the darker parts of the shot. But at least I walked away with something.

What kind of something? There is no”object” to the image, no story being told, and sadly, no dancing muse to immortalize. Just an arrangement of color and shape that hit me in some kind of emotional way. That and Steichen, that foundational pillar, calling up to me from the basement:

“Just take the shot.”

Advertisements

8 responses

  1. RICHARD RIGGLE

    Thank you, Michael. I am intrigued by your photo of the Statehouse. I have been there many times, but my imagination has limited my mind’s eye. You are very gifted both as a photographer and writer. You are educating my ignorance. I hope you have a wond

    December 15, 2012 at 1:50 PM

    • Thanks, Richard. I lived in Columbus most of my life, but the bright pastels of the original State house color scheme, part of the recent renovation of the building,occurred after I moved out West…..so I was glad to get a new look at things. Sometimes when you don’t get what you originally wanted, something else presents itself. Thank you so much for your kind words, and come back often!

      December 15, 2012 at 3:52 PM

  2. RICHARD RIGGLE

    Thank you, Michael. I am intrigued by your photo of the Statehouse. I have been there many times, but my imagination has limited my mind’s eye. You are very gifted both as a photographer and writer. You are educating my ignorance. I hope you have a wonderful Christmas and New Year.

    December 15, 2012 at 1:51 PM

  3. Colin Patrick

    The different angles and layers in this photo are fantastic.

    December 15, 2012 at 3:16 PM

    • Thanks. It was a grungy looking day because of the overcast, which made the inside of the building like a tomb….so I’m lucky I could get anything at all. Fortunately the pastel colors of the walls worked with the dim light, which tends to go warm and kind of orange anyway.

      December 15, 2012 at 3:49 PM

  4. themagicboot

    The different angles and layers in the photograph are fantastic.

    December 15, 2012 at 3:17 PM

  5. Excellent blog here! Also your web site loads up very fast!
    What web host are you using? Can I get your affiliate link
    to your host? I wish my site loaded up as fast as yours lol

    September 23, 2014 at 6:06 AM

    • I am hosted by http://www.wordpress.com, which has been a great home for THE NORMAL EYE since the start. They offer tons of ready-made templates and you can, of course opt to design things on your own. Great statistical reports, too. Thank you so much for your visits and your kind words. We post nearly every other day, so come back often!

      September 23, 2014 at 6:48 AM

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s