the photoshooter's journey from taking to making

THE OTHER TMI

Technical execution here is almost what's needed, but the concept still needs work. Write the shot off to practice.

Technical execution here is almost what’s needed, but the concept still needs work. Write the shot off to practice.

By MICHAEL PERKINS

THE WORST SOCIAL FAUX PAS OF OUR TIME may be the dreaded “TMI”, or the sin of sharing Too Much Information, creating awkward moments by regaling our friends with intimate details of our recent colostomies or carnal conquests. Funny thing is, much as we hate having this badge of uncoolness pinned to our chest, we commit its photographic equivalent all the time, and without a trace of shame.

I’m talking about the other TMI, or Too Many Images.

Let’s face it. Social media has encouraged too many of us to use the Web as a surplus warehouse dump for our photographs, many of them as ill-considered as a teenage girl’s hair flip. We’ve entered an endless loop of shoot-upload-repeat which seldom contains a step labeled “edit”. Worse, the vast storage space in our online photo vaults encourage us to share everything we shoot without so much as a backwards glance.

I’m suggesting that we take steps to stop treating the internet like an EPA Superfund site for images. I have tried to maintain a regular schedule of viewing the rearmost pages of my online archives, stuff from five years ago or longer, learning to ruthlessly rip out the shots that time has proven do not work. The goal is to force myself to re-think my original intentions and make every single photograph earn its slot in my overall profile. There are, by my calculation, three main sub-headings that these duds fall under:

The original idea for this shot is fairly strong, but my execution of it left something to be desired. Like execution.

The original idea for this shot is fairly strong, but my execution of it left something to be desired. Like execution.

A bad idea, well executed. Okay, you nailed the exposure and worked the gear to a “T”, but the picture has no story. There’s nothing being communicated or shared. Just because it’s sharp and well-lit doesn’t mean it deserves to stand alongside your stronger work.

A good idea, poorly executed.  Hey, if you believe so strongly in the concept, go back and do it right. Don’t give yourself a pass on bad technique because it was a noble effort.

An incomplete idea, which means it wasn’t even time to take the picture at all. Maybe you didn’t know how to get your message across, for whatever reason. Or maybe if you got the conception 100% right, it still wasn’t strong enough to jump off the page. The litmus test is, if you wouldn’t want someone’s random search of your stuff to land on this shot instead of your best one, lose it.

Online stats make some of these tortured choices a bit easier, since, when you are looking at low figures on shots that have been available forever, it’s pretty clear that they aren’t lighting up anyone’s world. And as lame as view and fave counts can be, they are at least an initial signal pointer toward sick cows that need to be thinned from the herd. The cure for photographic “TMI” is actually as easy as shooting for long enough to get better. With a wider body of work viewed over time, the strong stuff stands out in bolder contrast to the weaker stuff. And that shows you where to wield the scissors.

 

 

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2 responses

  1. This is a great post. You managed to make me laugh as well as thoughtfully consider my shots and get over my fear of deleting images. Let the purge begin!

    July 31, 2015 at 12:10 PM

    • Thank you so much. A little humor goes a long way as we kind of bounce and stumble along our path to improvement. And we need to remember that many of the greatest photographers of all time were either great editors, or worked for people who were. Cheers and come back anytime!

      July 31, 2015 at 1:18 PM

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