the photoshooter's journey from taking to making

RUIN AND RESURRECTION

Down The County Line Road, 2016. A fairly obvious study in "ruin" photography.

Down The County Line Road, 2016. A fairly obvious study in “ruin” photography. Or is it?

By MICHAEL PERKINS 

IN THE BEGINNING, PHOTOGRAPHY WAS MOSTLY ABOUT RECORDING, arresting time in its flight in order to preserve scenes for posterity. And, for its earliest practitioners, that purely technical feat of stopping the clock was enough. We still use the word capture to describe this harvesting of moments. Soon, however, photographs became truly interpretive. That is, they set out to be about something beyond a mere logging of the physical world. In so doing, they passed from documents to statements, with shooters choosing which world view they wanted to present.

I find that, even in the most complex documentary photos, those views seem to collect into two main camps of thought. One kind of image, which may be called the “ruin” category, depicts what we have lost. Abandoned buildings, wrecked cities, damaged lives. “Ruin” campers show the deterioration of things and ask us to assess the loss of dreams. The second general kind of interpretive category, which I’ll call the “resurrection” camp, shows the things that might have experienced ruin but are rebounding, on their way back up. Rez campers show the resiliency of the human spirit, the belief that there will, indeed, be a tomorrow.

Human beings being partisan by instinct, curators, editors, and audiences can, and do, glorify the pictures of one camp while decrying the worthlessness of images from the other camp, in what is really a false choice. Life is never cleanly divided between heaven and hell, and neither should your pictures be.

Photographs that show what we have wasted are no more “authentic” than those that show us recovering from loss. And truly great photographers  actually straddle both camps in their best work. But your purpose in a picture must be clear: the image at the top of this page seems to mourn the devastation of an old family farm. However, if I were to pull back to a larger frame, the camera would also show the freshly furrowed fields of a property that is in the process of being re-developed. Ruin or Resurrection? It’s down to approach, and context.

Some days it seems like the best story you can tell is a tragic one, but, at other times, there is nothing more courageously honest than depicting hope. It all depends on what comes to hand. The best plan is not to plan, to be open to whatever the best testimony is, right here, in this picture.

Right now.

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2 responses

  1. Wonderful thoughts.And interesting analysis.Lots to learn from this article.Thought provoking indeed ! Thanks for sharing the feelings and thoughts.

    March 31, 2016 at 7:08 AM

    • Thank you for your wonderful words. The conversations we begin on this forum afford me much discovery and joy. I truly appreciate your participation!

      April 2, 2016 at 7:28 AM

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